Prevent and detect insider cyberattacks

In one recent cybercrime scheme, a mortgage company employee accessed his employer’s records without authorization, then used stolen customer lists to start his own mortgage business. The perpetrator hacked the protected records by sending an email containing malware to a coworker.

This particular dishonest worker was caught. But your company may not be so lucky. One of your employees’ cybercrime schemes could end in financial losses or competitive disadvantages due to corporate espionage. 

Best practices

Why would trusted employees steal from the hand that feeds them? They could be working for a competitor or seeking revenge for perceived wrongs. Sometimes coercion by a third party or the need to pay gambling or addiction-related debts comes into play.

Although there are no guarantees that you’ll be able to foil every hacking scheme, your business can minimize the risk of insider theft by implementing several best practices: 

Restrict IT use. Your IT personnel should take proactive measures to restrict or monitor employee use of email accounts, websites, peer-to-peer networking, Instant Messaging protocols and File Transfer Protocol.

Remove access. When employees leave the company, immediately remove them from all access lists and ask them to return their means of access to secure accounts. Provide them with copies of any signed confidentiality agreements as a reminder of their legal responsibilities for maintaining data confidentiality.

Don’t neglect physical assets. Some data thefts occur the old-fashioned way — with employees absconding with materials after hours or while no one is looking. Typically, a crooked employee will print or photocopy documents and remove them from the workplace hidden in a briefcase or bag. Some dishonest employees remove files from cabinets, desks or other storage locations. Controls such as locks, surveillance cameras and restrictions to access can help prevent and deter theft.

Treat workers well. Create a positive work environment and treat employees fairly and with respect. This can encourage loyalty and trust, thereby minimizing potential motives for employee theft.

Wireless risk 

In addition to the previously named threats, your office’s wireless communication networks — including Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and cellular — can increase fraud risk. Fraud perpetrators can, for example, use mobile devices to gain access to sensitive information. One way to deter such activities is to restrict Wi-Fi to employees with special passwords or biometric access.

For more tips on preventing employee-originated cybercrime, or if you suspect a fraud scheme is underway, contact us for help.

© 2020 Covenant CPA

If you devote all your business’s security resources to fending off hackers and other cybercriminals, you may be unlocking the door, literally, to more basic types of theft. “Creepers” are criminals who gain access to offices or other physical facilities via unlocked doors and social engineering tactics. Once in, they steal proprietary information, inventory, computers and personal property, or gather information that makes it easier to hack your network.

Creepers in action

A major energy company’s Houston office was infiltrated by a creeper who’s believed to have stolen sensitive information, possibly to sell to a rival company or foreign government. Surveillance footage released by the FBI shows a man walking through an unlocked door in the middle of the night. He’s wearing office-appropriate clothing and moves confidently, like an employee who has a right to be there.

A Washington D.C. creeper also looked like she belonged where she didn’t. She walked into many supposedly secure government offices by chatting with employees outside the office, then following them through the door. When questioned, she claimed she’d left her badge at her desk.

In other cases, creepers use uniforms and props such as mops, toolboxes and clipboards to suggest they’re cleaners or that they work for building maintenance. They may wear stolen or forged ID badges, assuming that no one will examine them too closely.

Exercising vigilance

To protect your business’s and its employees’ property, keep all doors locked, even during work hours. Issue keycards and photo-ID badges to workers and instruct them to be on the lookout for possible intruders. They shouldn’t automatically assume, for example, that someone wearing coveralls and carrying a ladder is authorized to be there. And they shouldn’t unlock the door for anyone — even if that person seems like an employee — unless they know for certain he or she is.

If workers are uncomfortable approaching a possible intruder, they should immediately report the person to your office manager, HR director or building security. The stranger in question may well be an authorized visitor, but it’s better to be safe than sorry. Also ask employees to report the presence of former employees, who sometimes are recruited to carry out corporate espionage.

Even if you don’t keep high-value inventory or electronics on the premises, install security cameras. And instruct employees to lock up purses and wallets and to password-protect computers whenever they leave their workspaces — even if it’s only for a few minutes.

Virtual vs. physical threats

Obviously, IT security must remain a priority for all organizations. But don’t let virtual threats blind you to the need to protect against physical ones. Contact us for help preventing fraud and other forms of theft.

© 2019 Covenant CPA